Drop The Mic: Willie Jackson – Abernathy Magazine

Listen to “Drop the Mic” on Spreaker.

Willie Jackson is an inclusion strategist who empowers thoughtful organizations and the leaders who run them. He is the President and CEO of Equity Impact Group, Founder and Publisher of Abernathy Magazine, and a frequent writer and speaker on the topics of workplace equity, global diversity, and multicultural millennial leadership.

Twitter: @abernathymag

Top 5 Comedies

Drop The Mic: Anna Paone & Riley Fee of Backstage.com

Listen to “Drop The Mic: Anna Paone & Riley Fee of Backstage” on Spreaker.

Anna Paone

Anna Paone is a Theater & Performing Arts Casting Editor at Backstage. On the side, she acts in theater and film and is the artistic associate for Dragonfly Multicultural Arts Center, a theater company in NJ. Originally from New Jersey, she graduated from the University of Michigan with a degree in film. She loves the Mets, reality TV, and NYC restaurants.

Twitter: @annaphilomena
Instagram: @annaarbor

Top five comedies:

 

Riley Fee

Riley Fee is a Film & TV Casting Editor at Backstage. He was born and raised in Long Beach, NY and has always had an appreciation for art and entertainment. Riley has previously worked as a background casting associate on major network shows and films (such as CBS’s “Person of Interest” and Lionsgate’s “Nerve”) and is currently studying acting at the Barrow Group in NYC. Riley is a dog lover and is not a picky eater.
Instagram: @ryankeefee

Top five comedies:

Avoid a Screenwriting Trap: Tell a Story Instead of Explaining Your Movie

Avoid a Screenwriting Trap: Tell a Story Instead of Explaining Your Movie

This is why you shouldn’t think of your screenplay as a movie.

One of the more omnipresent traps that aspiring screenwriters succumb to in the actual writing and execution of their script is to think of their screenplay as a movie. 

I know, I know, that doesn’t sound right at all. A screenplay is a movie, right? 

Well no, it’s not. For non-established spec writers a screenplay is a written story that—if loved by enough industry folk—can then lead to being set up at a studio, and hopefully produced into a movie. 

It’s an extremely valuable distinction to make for aspiring screenwriters who write on spec, and here’s why.

Avoid being so engrossed in envisioning your finished product as a movie that you fail to fully articulate the story on the page.

Yes, writers should be envisioning their screenplay as a movie, which means writing visually, externalizing actions and conflicts, and applying form and function. However, the story has to be fully executed on the page first. 

That means that the narrative intentions of the writer have to be clear in the writing. The ideas associated with the story; individual beats, moments, subtext, emotional nuance, and the plot itself, have to be transparent to the reader. 

Most reading this article would think that’s a complete and utter given; yet lack of clarity is a trap that far too many aspiring screenwriters fall into and never even realize it. 

Spotlight


‘Spotlight,’ 2016 Oscar winner for Best Original Screenplay

Your screenplay must be understandable on its own

Screenwriters can get locked into the movie they’re envisioning in their head, one that’s filled with amazing images, and casted with brilliant actors, and has amazing cinematography and sound. The challenge is that they often get so caught up in seeing it, that they lose sight of the fact that it has to be read first.  

In other words, they’re so engrossed in envisioning the finished product as a movie that they fail to fully articulate the story on the page. And as any studio reader will tell you, that’s a knife in the belly of any screenplay that will instantly cut the life of your read short.  

Simply put, instead of writing a story for a reader, they’re writing a movie for a producer. Instead of telling a story, they’re explaining a movie. 

I’ve seen it happen far too often. I would read a writer’s spec only to be constantly stopping because it lacked clarity.

The repercussions

Writing a movie for a producer or director in mind instead of writing a story for a reader is a mistake, as it can directly lead to ambiguity in the writing. Parts of the story are on the page, but other parts are vague and still in the writer’s head, attached to that awesome three-dimensional finished movie that one has to actually see in order to fully comprehend its story. 

In my years of teaching and consulting I’ve seen it happen far too often. I would read a writer’s spec only to be constantly stopping because it lacked clarity. I’m constantly being “taken out of the read” because the writer’s narrative intentions aren’t clear on the page. Instead of being engaged, I’m confused. 

However, when I sit down with the writer and he or she explains it to me, it all makes perfect sense. 

As an example of this at play, let’s take an excerpt from a spec script I consulted on that illustrates this notion of failing to articulate a vision The following is a before and after snapshot of the scene. Here’s the before version:

Spec Script before


Spec script before clarification.

When I sat down with the screenwriter, I explained that the scene confused me on many levels, and that I sensed there was supposed to be much more here that wasn’t being articulated. 

Upon hearing this, the writer eagerly launched into an emotional explanation of the scene and its narrative intent as related to the story as a whole. It was both compelling and moving, yet it was entirely missing from the page. It was still in the writer’s imagination in movie form. 

After rewriting the scene per our discussion, here’s what the “after” version looked like:

Spec script after


Spec script after clarification.

As you can see, the scene took on a whole new life by simply clarifying beats and emotional intentions. 

And therein lies the rub, because your screenplay isn’t going to come with a person to explain it. When your screenplay goes out into the world, it doesn’t go with a person attached who can clarify or explain scene intentions. 

For non-established screenwriters a screenplay has to be a piece of material that stands on its own merit. It’s not a blueprint for a movie. It’s a literary version of a movie. And thus it has to engage and move the reader just like a great movie does an audience. 

When your screenplay goes out into the world, it doesn’t go with a person attached who can clarify or explain scene intentions. 

How to overcome it

Ambiguity is the enemy of your screenplay. Curiosity is its hero. Meaning, truly engaging writing generates narrative curiosity, causing the reader to want to read more in order to know more. Ambiguous writing just causes confusion. Or, as I like to put it, curiosity is “good confusion” whereas ambiguity is not.  

One exercise I would have my former MFA screenwriting students do was to read their finished first draft scene-by-scene as if they were a lit agent reading it for the first time. In other words, step outside yourself and be an objective reader. What would the agent’s informational and emotional takeaway from each scene be? Does it match what your intention as a writer was for the scene? 

Doing this forces you to to take the intuitive ideas you wrote and articulate them into specific choices in the rewriting stage. (Note: Experienced writers tend to do this organically in the outline or first draft stage of the process.)

The bottom line

The bottom line is: a spec writer’s audience is the people who will be reading their screenplay, which may include agents, managers, development execs, and readers doing coverage on it.

Executing the story on the page is everything. It’s the difference between the reader understanding the nuance of your story or not. Between them being engaged in the read or not. Between them continuing to read it or tossing it. 

In order for your screenplay to ever actually become a movie, people have to love it as a story first. And that story has to be on the page.
     

Source: No Film School

Think Classic Cinema Doesn’t Translate to VR? Here’s How to Bring 3-Act Structure to 360

Think Classic Cinema Doesn’t Translate to VR? Here’s How to Bring 3-Act Structure to 360

“We’re leveraging several thousand years of history and classical storytelling. It’s kind of our DNA.”

Many filmmakers are skeptical about virtual reality’s ability to convey a story like a traditional film can. There are no shots. There are no cuts. So how can it? Some Sundance filmmakers found success this year by employing a time-tested cinematic technique: a traditional character arc.

At the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, Félix Lajeunesse and Paul Raphaël of Felix & Paul Studios unveiled their 40 minute VR comedy Miyubi and Maureen Fan, Kane Lee, and Eric Darnell (Madagascar) of Baobab Studios premiered their animated VR film, ASTEROIDS!  They joined a panel discussion titled Pushing the Creative Frontiers in VR Filmmaking to share what they have figured out. Below are our biggest takeaways on how and why you should consider merging VR with a traditional story arc.


A still from ASTEROIDS! by Eric Darnell, an official selection of the New Frontier VR Experiences program at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute.

Create a VR three-act structure by mimicking the human brain

 At the premiere of ASTEROIDS! (an alien space journey where you can play with your pet robot dog), Eric Darnell, the director behind DreamWorks Animation’s Madagascar films, told No Film School that story structure is crucial to VR.

“While storytelling may vary from film to television to theater to literature, there’s always this overarching structure,” said Darnell. “The toolkit is different in each medium, but they’re serving the same higher goal. That’s how I look at it here. We’re leveraging several thousand years of history and classical storytelling. It’s kind of our DNA. We have a different toolkit, but we keep our eyes on the prize of having a great story and telling it well. And having likeable characters.”

“You release cortisol, a stress hormone, or oxytocin, a love hormone, at certain times that mimic the three-act structure.”

During the panel discussion, Fan added that the three-act structure in VR may even stem from a biological need. “Your body releases chemicals at certain moments during a movie,” said Fan. “You release cortisol, a stress hormone, or oxytocin, a love hormone, at certain times that mimic the three-act structure. We have to pay attention to that.” Kane agreed. “Story evolved into our DNA for a reason.”

Use disruption to prevent VR performances from going stale

Something about the immersive environment of VR can make the acting seem…bad! Terrible acting is prevalent in narrative VR these days, which can make it difficult to relate to the characters. There’s a reason for that, according to Paul Raphaël, and a way to try to avoid it.

“VR comes with more verisimilitude,” said Raphaël. “With film there is more abstraction from reality because of cutting between different shots at different lenses. Because VR is closer to what you see in reality, you are more critical of what you are seeing. You can detect any false notes and fakeness. The best way we’ve found to counter this is to leave space for mistakes when you are writing.” Lajeunesse added to his collaborator’s assertions. “On Miyubi, we would tell actors to disrupt the scene, so everyone has an authentic reaction. We strategically added some errors that can’t be faked.”


Ted Sutherland, Tatum Kensington Bailey, Richard Riehle, Emily Bergl, Owen Vaccaro and P.J. Byrne appear in Miyubi by Felix Lajeunesse and Paul Raphael, an official selection of the New Frontier VR Experiences program at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute | photo by Felix & Paul Studios.

“Because VR is closer to what you see in reality, you are more critical of what you are seeing. You can detect any false notes and fakeness.”

Script & storyboard with 360 in mind

All the creators agreed emphatically that new solutions were needed to write for narrative VR with a proper story arc.

“In fiction VR, we write like cinema,” said Lajeunesse, whose film Miyubi places the viewer into the perspective toy robot in a tumultuous 1980s family home. “The difference is we take away the lexicon of cinema. When ready, we transfer the story to a 360 storyboard. We do a birds’ eye view, we animate little dots, and craft the staging this way. That’s a form of writing for us.”


Richard Riehle, Ted Sutherland, Owen Vaccaro, Emily Bergl, P.J. Byrne and Tatum Kensington Bailey appear in Miyubi by Felix Lajeunesse and Paul Raphael, an official selection of the New Frontier VR Experiences program at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute | photo by Felix & Paul Studios.

Keep your mind open to interactivity, even if it doesn’t fully work yet

Let’s face it, a lot of VR interactivity feels a little hokey right now. But that could be changing.

“We want to merge game and film in the right way,” said Fan, who comes from a gaming background. “When you’re playing a game, right away you think, what does the game-maker want me to do now? We don’t want that. So we looked into science of how to connect you to a character. We started with a robot dog who will mirror you, to get you to bond with it. ”

Paul Raphaël agreed that there are difficulties at this stage. “We hadn’t jumped into [interactivity] earlier because of the chasm between game and story. You get the feeling you are in a game, where these are the rules of game. So it doesn’t effect experience in the right way. Not to mention, the minute you let the viewer do things, the viewer wants to do everything.”


A still from ASTEROIDS! by Eric Darnell, an official selection of the New Frontier VR Experiences program at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute.

How important could nailing immersion and interactivity be to the future of film?

“Kids growing up with this immersion will naturally will get used to it and want all their content to be like this,” concluded Lajeunesse. “If that happens, 25 years into the future, media that is not immersive or interactive may not exist.” Added Raphaël, “It might not replace it altogether, but it will certainly cannibalize it.”


For more, see our complete coverage of the 2017 Sundance Film Festival.

 

No Film School’s video and editorial coverage of the 2017 Sundance Film Festival is sponsored by RODE Microphones.      

Source: No Film School

Film industry spent $12.5 billion since 2014 and created 70,000 jobs … – Crain’s New York Business

Film industry spent $12.5 billion since 2014 and created 70,000 jobs … – Crain’s New York Business


Crain’s New York Business

Film industry spent $12.5 billion since 2014 and created 70,000 jobs …
Crain’s New York Business
A report commissioned by the state found the economic boost went mainly to New York City.

and more »

Source: New York,Film

Inside the First IMAX VR Experience Centre

The first IMAX VR Experience Centre has officially opened in LA. The company has unsurprisingly modeled the destination much like a movie theater, one that offers up immersive experiences on the latest VR hardware through a pay-to-play model. With plans to open more locations this year, Road to VR stepped inside the first IMAX VR Experience Centre to find out what you can expect.


noah-nelsonGuest Article By Noah Nelson

Noah is the former head writer of Turnstyle News, a public media website that covers tech and entertainment, and a project of Youth Radio. He’s also the founder of founder of No Proscenium, the guide to immersive entertainment.


For nearly all of 2016 we all talked about it: the moment when VR arcades in the US were going to become ‘a thing’.

There were demos at conventions and stories on sites like this one. Of course, there was The Void (and a few others like it)—which crafted proprietary VR systems for unique experiences not capable on other hardware—though they haven’t yet generated much buzz outside of the tech world.

The missing piece of the VR puzzle still remains the channel to give folks who haven’t seen high end VR yet a way to try it (and a reason to want to). One that doesn’t require them to lay out a lot of money, know someone with a headset, or functions as a sales pitch in an electronics store. The good news is that the new IMAX VR Experience Centre in LA could be a stepping stone to changing that.

imax-vr-centre

Photo courtesy Peter Sciretta

Driving home from work the other day I passed by a building on Fairfax in the center of LA that had been branded with the IMAX VR logo. I wasn’t sure if it was IMAX’s offices for their VR operations or something more consumer-facing. I bet on the later, as it was in the exact same location—across the street from LA’s landmark Farmer’s Market—as the Samsung Gear demo house a year before.

I stopped in the next day to find out this was the flagship location in IMAX’s planned VR project. While the Grand Opening had not happened just yet, that didn’t stop me from becoming a paying customer right on the spot. I paid $10 to play the John Wick promo experience on Starbreeze’s StarVR headset for about 12-15 minutes.

It was only my second time in a StarVR headset, and this model seemed a hell of a lot lighter than an older model I’d tried previously. It felt no heavier than the current Oculus gear. The resolution left something to be desired in terms of the draw distance, but that might have also been the game.

That’s not the important thing, not this time. You want to know about the venue.

Photo courtesy IMAX

Photo courtesy IMAX

The lobby of the IMAX VR Experience Center is set up like a cross between a movie theatre and a Starfleet doctor’s office. There are video poster walls displaying ads for the various experiences, a showtimes board showing what is available, a couple of ticket salespeople and two rows of cushioned benches arrayed behind a decorative wall and in front of two video monitors. Those monitors play the orientation video for the newbs. I probably should have watched it, but I was in a rush.

Photo courtesy IMAX

Photo courtesy IMAX

Past the monitors was a door that led into the back, where the ‘pods’ were kept. I was expecting sealed in rooms with that name, but they were pretty much big cubicles, about the size of a small apartment’s living room. In other words: just big enough for room-scale VR. There were a lot of pods back there, with a few different sizes and differing amounts of walls and baffling, although no acoustical foam what I could see.

imax-vr-podsIt was less industrial and more approachable looking, all couched in the transactional metaphors of the movies. The attendant tore my ticket, and the showtime board was—from what I could tell—really just for show. There were a lot of options: from The Star Wars themed Trials on Tatooine to the aforementioned John Wick Chronicles, along with a sampler pack with a bunch of others. The implication being that there will be new content coming in all the time.

Of course, if you have a room-scale VR setup at home, there’s presently little point to going to the IMAX VR Experience Centre. There’s not much available that you can’t already access at home. But then again you aren’t their target market; this is for the people who don’t want to drop $1,000-plus on a high-end VR setup.

If IMAX does want to attract serious VR enthusiasts, they’ll benefit from being even more like a movie theater; at the cinema, you primarily get two things you can’t get at home: a much better viewing experience, and content that isn’t yet available outside of the theater.

The StarVR headset—which is not priced for the consumer market—is a good first step in that direction, but right now the headset is only available for a limited number of experiences. Hopefully things like the Vive Tracker will open the door to more specialized accessories that can make the VR arcade experience a step above the in-home VR experience.

Then there’s the matter of content; at this stage, the most enticing IP presently available (Star Wars and John Wick) is already available through normal consumer distribution channels (and in the case of Star Wars, actually free!). IMAX certainly has content in their sites though—having committed $50 million to creating ‘a new level of premium, high-quality VR content’ last year—but it’ll take some time before we see premium content that’s drawing VR early adopters to the venue.

For those without their own high-end VR at home, the still-open question is whether ten minutes in VR heaven is worth $10. Having actually dropped the cash, I can’t say that it necessarily is. Not past the novelty point. Oh sure, I can see myself, having been impressed with Star Wars: Trials on Tatooine, going back and dropping another $10 on the next chapter in that experience or some other marquee content, but there’s something about not even getting a guaranteed quarter hour of fun that seems weird. And yes, I’m someone who spends $5 on coffee and buys Star Wars figures, but those are addictions.

Right now the best VR content in my view are things like Tilt Brush, Medium, and Mindshow; creative tools that you want to linger with, not get kicked out of after ten minutes. IMAX VR, or any of the other pay-to-play VR business models are going to need some killer apps to turn the curious into repeat customers.

The post Inside the First IMAX VR Experience Centre appeared first on Road to VR.


Read more via Road to VR

Game-Changing Location Based Virtual Reality Venture Dreamscape Immersive to Launch September 2017

Game-Changing Location Based Virtual Reality Venture Dreamscape Immersive to Launch September 2017

Game-Changing Location Based Virtual Reality Venture Dreamscape Immersive to Launch September 2017

Prolific film producer and former studio head Walter Parkes and global live entertainment producer/entrepreneur Kevin Wall today announced the completion of the Series A financing of Dreamscape Immersive. Utilizing ground-breaking technology developed by Swiss researchers Dr. Caecilia Charbonnier and Sylvain Chagué of the Artanim Foundation, Dreamscape untethers its audience members from the computer, and allows them to walk freely with friends within a virtual world, where they see themselves, interact with objects and each other, and experience worlds previously accessible only in their imaginations.

Bold Capital Partners led the Series A with investments from Warner Bros., 21st Century Fox, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), IMAX Corporation, Westfield Corporation, and Steven Spielberg. Dreamscape’s innovative technology, which is an outgrowth of Artanim’s breakthrough work in medical imaging and body mechanics, was debuted earlier this week at the Abundance 360 Conference in Beverly Hills. Peter Diamandis, Co-Founder of Singularity University, described the platform to the audience of CEOs and entrepreneurs as “the future of entertainment.”

The venture also includes a top-of-field leadership team. Joining Co-Chairmen Parkes and Wall as CEO is Bruce Vaughn, 25-year veteran of Disney Imagineering, who served as its Co-Executive Leader for seven years. As Vaughn notes, “The promise of VR has been greater than the reality…until now. Dreamscape delivers on the promise — to be actively transported into alternate realities where you have experiences and interact with others as naturally as you would in our physical world.”

Vaughn and the upper management will be a stellar advisory group that includes: Yves Behar, renowned industrial designer, as Brand and Design Advisor; Hans Zimmer, Music Advisor; Dan Fellman, Past President, Domestic Distribution, Warner Bros. Pictures, as Distribution Advisor; and Kevin Ratner, President, Forest City Residential West, Real Estate Advisor.

Walter Parkes points out: “The core technologies on which Dreamscape is built are truly game changing — but as with all such innovations, it’s ultimately about content, and the creation of experiences that engage and move people in a way never before imagined. This is why we’ve assembled a team with years of proven success in the creation and distribution of global entertainment; our goal is to move VR into the mainstream.”

Dreamscape Immersive is positioned to provide a strategic opportunity for two sectors of the consumer economy which face similar challenges of drawing customers away from home-based digital alternatives: movies and retail shopping malls.

On the real estate side, Dreamscape’s vision of the VR Multiplex unlocks opportunity within global real estate to reinvigorate the shifting retail landscape by creating unique, irreproducible entertainment experiences that are vivid and compelling enough to bring consumers out of the house and into larger social and retail environments. For motion picture studios and other IP holders, Dreamscape provides another alternative for audiences to enjoy both original experiences and franchised properties.

As Kevin Wall explains: “Today, audiences can see movies in theaters in three formats: 2D, 3D, and IMAX. Dreamscape establishes the Fourth Platform — VR. Now, audiences will have the ability to purchase a ticket, step inside of the story and experience it personally in a way never before imagined.”

Former President of Control Room and partner in the formation of Dreamscape, Aaron Grosky, will serve as Chief Operating Officer. Joining Vaughn from Imagineering will be his Chief Experience Officer Kevin Rice and Chief Software Designer Chris Purvis. Caecilia Charbonnier, Sylvain Chagué and Ronald Menzel, co-founders of Dreamscape, will serve respectively as co-CTOs and Chief Strategic Officer.

Dreamscape Immersive will launch their flagship VR Multiplex in Fall 2017 as part of the reopening of Westfield’s Century City Mall.

About Walter Parkes
Walter Parkes is a motion picture producer, writer and former studio head at DreamWorks Pictures, the motion picture studio that he and his wife and partner Laurie MacDonald ran from the company’s inception through 2005. Films produced or executive produced by Parkes include The Men in Black series, Gladiator, Minority Report, Flight, Catch Me If You Can and many others. A three-time Oscar nominee and, as a writer with partner Lawrence Lasker, Parkes largely introduced the tech-thriller genre with the original screenplays for War Games and Sneakers. In total, films produced by Parkes have earned in excess of $7B in worldwide box office.

About Kevin Wall
Kevin Wall is an Emmy Award-winning producer, activist and new media entrepreneur. Wall has enjoyed more than three decades in producing and distributing live, multi-artist music events, most notably Live 8, a global live event which earned Wall an Emmy Award. He pioneered the platform-agnostic digital media model making entertainment content available on all mediums and devices. His company — Control Room — has delivered more than 100 TV specials since 2005, featuring international superstars such as Madonna, Jay-Z, Rihanna, and more, across a variety of networks and platforms in 192 countries around the world.

About Bruce Vaughn
Bruce Vaughn was Chief Creative Executive, Walt Disney Imagineering for The Walt Disney Company. In this role, he lead the integrated creative teams of Walt Disney Imagineering (WDI), Disney’s Creative Entertainment (DCE) and WDI Research and Development to drive excellence in product development and innovation. The scope of Vaughn’s responsibilities included theme park attractions and special effects, innovative theater experiences, and new business opportunities that leverage invented and emerging technologies.

About the Artanim Foundation:
Artanim Foundation is a Swiss research center based in Geneva founded in 2011 by three motion capture specialists: Dr. Caecilia Charbonnier, Clementine Lo and Sylvain Chagué. Artanim conducts research activities in the fields of orthopedics and sport medicine, 3D animation and VR/AR applications. The ground-breaking VR technology created by Caecilia Charbonnier — former professional tennis player reconverted into a biomechanics and computer graphics researcher — and Sylvain Chagué — computer science engineer — is the result of four years of research at Artanim. The technology was showcased at SIGGRAPH 2015, at the Sundance Film Festival and at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016. More info: www.artanim.ch

About BOLD Capital Partners:
BOLD Capital Partners (“BOLD”), is a venture capital firm targeting investments in early stage and growth technology companies. BOLD is particularly interested in entrepreneurial leaders that leverage exponential technologies to transform the world and create innovative solutions to humanities’ grand challenges. The investment platform leverages the resources of Singularity University (www.su.org) and the Peter Diamandis ecosystem (www.diamandis.com) to actively seek and support world class entrepreneurs. BOLD has offices in Santa Monica and Palo Alto, California.

The post Game-Changing Location Based Virtual Reality Venture Dreamscape Immersive to Launch September 2017 appeared first on Virtual Reality Reporter by VR Reporter

Source: Virtual Reality Reporter

Game-Changing Location Based Virtual Reality Venture Dreamscape Immersive to Launch September 2017

Game-Changing Location Based Virtual Reality Venture Dreamscape Immersive to Launch September 2017

Prolific film producer and former studio head Walter Parkes and global live entertainment producer/entrepreneur Kevin Wall today announced the completion of the Series A financing of Dreamscape Immersive. Utilizing ground-breaking technology developed by Swiss researchers Dr. Caecilia Charbonnier and Sylvain Chagué of the Artanim Foundation, Dreamscape untethers its audience members from the computer, and allows them to walk freely with friends within a virtual world, where they see themselves, interact with objects and each other, and experience worlds previously accessible only in their imaginations.

Bold Capital Partners led the Series A with investments from Warner Bros., 21st Century Fox, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), IMAX Corporation, Westfield Corporation, and Steven Spielberg. Dreamscape’s innovative technology, which is an outgrowth of Artanim’s breakthrough work in medical imaging and body mechanics, was debuted earlier this week at the Abundance 360 Conference in Beverly Hills. Peter Diamandis, Co-Founder of Singularity University, described the platform to the audience of CEOs and entrepreneurs as “the future of entertainment.”

The venture also includes a top-of-field leadership team. Joining Co-Chairmen Parkes and Wall as CEO is Bruce Vaughn, 25-year veteran of Disney Imagineering, who served as its Co-Executive Leader for seven years. As Vaughn notes, “The promise of VR has been greater than the reality…until now. Dreamscape delivers on the promise — to be actively transported into alternate realities where you have experiences and interact with others as naturally as you would in our physical world.”

Vaughn and the upper management will be a stellar advisory group that includes: Yves Behar, renowned industrial designer, as Brand and Design Advisor; Hans Zimmer, Music Advisor; Dan Fellman, Past President, Domestic Distribution, Warner Bros. Pictures, as Distribution Advisor; and Kevin Ratner, President, Forest City Residential West, Real Estate Advisor.

Walter Parkes points out: “The core technologies on which Dreamscape is built are truly game changing — but as with all such innovations, it’s ultimately about content, and the creation of experiences that engage and move people in a way never before imagined. This is why we’ve assembled a team with years of proven success in the creation and distribution of global entertainment; our goal is to move VR into the mainstream.”

Dreamscape Immersive is positioned to provide a strategic opportunity for two sectors of the consumer economy which face similar challenges of drawing customers away from home-based digital alternatives: movies and retail shopping malls.

On the real estate side, Dreamscape’s vision of the VR Multiplex unlocks opportunity within global real estate to reinvigorate the shifting retail landscape by creating unique, irreproducible entertainment experiences that are vivid and compelling enough to bring consumers out of the house and into larger social and retail environments. For motion picture studios and other IP holders, Dreamscape provides another alternative for audiences to enjoy both original experiences and franchised properties.

As Kevin Wall explains: “Today, audiences can see movies in theaters in three formats: 2D, 3D, and IMAX. Dreamscape establishes the Fourth Platform — VR. Now, audiences will have the ability to purchase a ticket, step inside of the story and experience it personally in a way never before imagined.”

Former President of Control Room and partner in the formation of Dreamscape, Aaron Grosky, will serve as Chief Operating Officer. Joining Vaughn from Imagineering will be his Chief Experience Officer Kevin Rice and Chief Software Designer Chris Purvis. Caecilia Charbonnier, Sylvain Chagué and Ronald Menzel, co-founders of Dreamscape, will serve respectively as co-CTOs and Chief Strategic Officer.

Dreamscape Immersive will launch their flagship VR Multiplex in Fall 2017 as part of the reopening of Westfield’s Century City Mall.

About Walter Parkes
Walter Parkes is a motion picture producer, writer and former studio head at DreamWorks Pictures, the motion picture studio that he and his wife and partner Laurie MacDonald ran from the company’s inception through 2005. Films produced or executive produced by Parkes include The Men in Black series, Gladiator, Minority Report, Flight, Catch Me If You Can and many others. A three-time Oscar nominee and, as a writer with partner Lawrence Lasker, Parkes largely introduced the tech-thriller genre with the original screenplays for War Games and Sneakers. In total, films produced by Parkes have earned in excess of $7B in worldwide box office.

About Kevin Wall
Kevin Wall is an Emmy Award-winning producer, activist and new media entrepreneur. Wall has enjoyed more than three decades in producing and distributing live, multi-artist music events, most notably Live 8, a global live event which earned Wall an Emmy Award. He pioneered the platform-agnostic digital media model making entertainment content available on all mediums and devices. His company — Control Room — has delivered more than 100 TV specials since 2005, featuring international superstars such as Madonna, Jay-Z, Rihanna, and more, across a variety of networks and platforms in 192 countries around the world.

About Bruce Vaughn
Bruce Vaughn was Chief Creative Executive, Walt Disney Imagineering for The Walt Disney Company. In this role, he lead the integrated creative teams of Walt Disney Imagineering (WDI), Disney’s Creative Entertainment (DCE) and WDI Research and Development to drive excellence in product development and innovation. The scope of Vaughn’s responsibilities included theme park attractions and special effects, innovative theater experiences, and new business opportunities that leverage invented and emerging technologies.

About the Artanim Foundation:
Artanim Foundation is a Swiss research center based in Geneva founded in 2011 by three motion capture specialists: Dr. Caecilia Charbonnier, Clementine Lo and Sylvain Chagué. Artanim conducts research activities in the fields of orthopedics and sport medicine, 3D animation and VR/AR applications. The ground-breaking VR technology created by Caecilia Charbonnier — former professional tennis player reconverted into a biomechanics and computer graphics researcher — and Sylvain Chagué — computer science engineer — is the result of four years of research at Artanim. The technology was showcased at SIGGRAPH 2015, at the Sundance Film Festival and at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016. More info: www.artanim.ch

About BOLD Capital Partners:
BOLD Capital Partners (“BOLD”), is a venture capital firm targeting investments in early stage and growth technology companies. BOLD is particularly interested in entrepreneurial leaders that leverage exponential technologies to transform the world and create innovative solutions to humanities’ grand challenges. The investment platform leverages the resources of Singularity University (www.su.org) and the Peter Diamandis ecosystem (www.diamandis.com) to actively seek and support world class entrepreneurs. BOLD has offices in Santa Monica and Palo Alto, California.

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We’re Looking for Sci-fi Web Series for SYFI NYC

We’re looking for #scifi #animation #sciencefiction #tv #shortfilm web series for SYFI NYC!

New York Film Loft hosts SYFI NEW YORK a one of a kind event where webisodic series producers can submit their sizzle reels and trailers to an audience of film/tv and media professionals and distributors (Looking for new and innovative content for your channel? Click to Request an Invite to attend!).

NY Film Loft is also launching it’s own online sci-fi channel (COMING SOON!!).

https://filmfreeway.com/festival/syfinyc